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Today on UpAlong - Happy Friday!
 
  Headline: St. John's Destoryed
Horrible Sight

It's the anniversary of the Great Fire of 1892. The Great Fire in St. John's on July 8, 1892, is remembered as the worst disaster ever to befall the city.

At approximately five o'clock in the afternoon on the July 8, 1892, a dropped pipe in Timothy Brine's stable at Freshwater Road at the top of Carter's Hill began what would become the worst fire in St. John's history. Initially the fire did not cause any widespread panic, however a series of catastrophic coincidences caused the fire to spread and devour virtually all of the east end of the city, including much of its major commercial area before being extinguished.

Rev Moses Harvey witnessed the initial stages of the fire and remarked to his friend that it "was a bad day for a fire. A high wind from the north-west was blowing, hurling the sparks far and wide on the roofs of the clusters of wooden houses. For a month previous hardly any rain had fallen, and the shingled roofs were like tinder." The situation was exacerbated because of work completed earlier in the day on the water mains. Although water flow was re-established by 3 p.m., two hours before the fire began, water pressure was insufficient to force water up into the higher sections of the city where the fire began. W. J Kent remarked that the "flames therefore made headway before water was procurable, and as a very high westerly wind was furiously fanning the fire it began to spread rapidly."

An hour into the blaze the people of St. John's realised that the fire could not be contained in the area of Brine's farm. Because locals believed stone walls would withstand the flames, residents moved valuables into numerous stone buildings in the city. One of the most common refuge areas was the Anglican Cathedral of St. John the Baptist. The ....

 

  Card Game Rules - 120's

Nothing says Newfoundland fun like a good, old-fashioned game of 120’s.


Visit the 120s page for the complete listing.

A Bit of History and Background
It’s a game that spans generations, one that untold numbers of Newfoundlanders have learned at the kitchen table with only a well-worn deck of cards and the patient instruction of a parent or grandparent.

It’s something to do for a laugh — throw in a few dollars, build up a little kitty.

The 120s version of choice there is partners, three sets of two. There’s so many different ways of playing the game: there’s call-for-your-partner, partners — you can even play on your own.

The game involves a dash of skill, a pinch of luck — and a healthy dollop of social interaction. There is a bit of skill involved,- even if you’re lucky enough to get the cards, you’ve still got to know how to play.

The card game many Newfoundlanders know as 120s has many different monikers: among them are Auction and Growl. There is also an abbreviated version of the game called 45s, usually just played by two or three people.

It’s also undeniably a part of the rich fabric of Newfoundland and Labrador life. Many a dining room table is scarred by wedding rings slammed down in the joy or frustration of playing a particularly passionate card.

The game’s roots are thought to trace back to Ireland and Scotland in the mid-16th century, when it was called Maw, then Spoil Five. It is believed to have made its way from there to Newfoundland and parts of Nova Scotia.

This card game evolved in rules and name as it travelled from Scotland and Ireland to Newfoundland and Nova Scotia and ultimatel ....

 

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  Dart Player Turns Pro

Outport dart player Tom Clayton announced at the Hotel Newfoundland that he was joining the Canadian Pro Dart circuit, effective immediately, if not, sooner.

After 20 some-odd years of carrying his various teams to victories of home-made knitted socks and frozen turkeys, Tom figured that his skills are on par, if not more so, with the pro’s.

“I’m WAY beyond the days of tearing up me flights, and jumping on me darts”, said Tom, “and my ulcers have all healed, so I figured its time to take playing darts to the next level.”

Some of Tom’s old team-mates are excited that he has finally decided to turn pro.

“He’s some good, bye”, relates Joe Keeping, “We’ve been telling he for years that he’s much better than those guys on the CBC. Sure those guys don’t even drink a beer while their playing. Ole Tom only gets better with the more beer he drinks. Either that, or we all gets worse.”

Canadian Pro Dart officials published on their website this: “We are excited and proud that Tom Clayton has finally joined our ranks. We look forward to bearing witness to his multiple tuns.”

We here at UpAlong.org wish Tom all the best.

....

 

  Devastating: New Mary Browns “Skinwich” doesn’t actually exist
Heart-ache.

For those who longed to sink their teeth into five layers of crispy chicken skin, Canadian cheese and bacon, Mary Browns spokesman, John Bayman, has some bad news. Tonight he confirmed that the "Mary Skinwich" was “just the result of someone having a little fun online”.

“While there is nothing like the taste of the Mary Browns recipe,” Bayman wrote, “the best way to enjoy it is on a piece of Mary Browns chicken.”

 

  
Heart-ache.

For those who longed to sink their teeth into five la ....


 








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